How To Eliminate Your Fade

Q.

Hi, Jack:

I’m struggling with a high cut or fade and am losing valuable meters off the tee with this type of shot. Please assist me to hit a straighter drive or even a draw

Regards,

Garth

 A.

Thanks for the question, Garth. Jack Nicklaus hit a power fade when playing on the PGA Tour. The shot served him quite well. But hitting a fade doesn’t work in every situation. That’s why it’s good to know how to hit a draw.

Follow the five keys listed below and you’ll find yourself hitting a draw in no time:

Adopt a closed stance

  • Use a stronger left-hand grip
  • Follow an inside track
  • Aim right at the top of the swing
  • Release the club through impact

The key to hitting a draw is using an in-to-out swing path instead of an out-to-in swing path when hitting a fade. To make this change, you must adjust both your stance and your grip. Try the following next time you’re at the range.

Take a square stance. Then draw your right foot back a few inches. These changes close your stance and clubface. They also encourage you to follow an in-to-out swing path into the ball, rather than the out-to-in path you follow when hitting a fade. Adopting a slightly stronger left-hand grip encourages you to make an active release of the hands and imparts the necessary sidespin needed for a draw.  To adopt a stronger grip, turn your left hand until you see three knuckles. Now swing away.

Here’s a drill that teaches you to hit a draw:

Tee up a ball. Position it forward in your stance. Now drop to your knees. Swing back and through, knocking the ball of the tee. Don’t worry about how far you hit it. Swinging back is easy. But coming forward is not. You’ll probably hit the ground a few times before hitting the ball cleanly. That’s your shoulders kicking in. You’ll make solid contact with the ball once your arms learn to control the shoulders.

Practicing this drill helps you hit a draw. Before long, you’ll be hitting one on demand, just like the pros do, and gaining more yardage off the tee.